Many bodybuilders believe that the decline skull crusher is superior to the flat bench variation. The decline produces the greatest range of motion and provides high levels of stretch that optimize muscle hypertrophy. But most triceps exercises done with free weights involve little tension in the contracted (top) position. Not so with the kettlebell skull crusher.

Decline Kettlebell Skull Crusher

Kettlebells provide constant tension because of the angle of pull. This produces greater occlusion, triggering metabolic stress, cellular volumization, and overall muscle pump, all of which are key mechanisms for growth. The decline kettlebell skull crusher also hits all three heads of the triceps.

The decline reduces involvement of the shoulders, forcing the brunt of the work on the triceps. Many lifters also find the decline position to be easier on the elbow joint.

How To Do Them

Lie on a decline bench angled at 15-20 degrees and perform a standard skull crusher by pivoting at the elbow joint and lowering the weight to the sides of the forehead. Pause at the bottom, then forcefully drive the kettlebells back to the top, stopping just shy of lockout. Repeat for several sets of 6-8 reps.

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