Anyone who's ever picked up a weight has learned a little about physics, whether he knows it or not. For instance, most of us realize that if you put three 45-pound plates on only one side of a bench press, the bar will catapult itself through the a plate glass window and impale the nearest jogger. While this may be good for a couple of laughs, it's time-consuming and ultimately not conducive to a good workout.

Similarly, most of us know that depending on what hand or foot position you use, lifting a weight – the same weight – can either be easier or harder. Case in point: a 100-pound standard barbell curl is much easier to do than a 100-pound reverse curl.

This particular system takes advantage of that fact. It involves doing a set of a particular exercise at a heavy load – so heavy that you reach failure in maybe 2-3 reps – and then, rather than quitting, simply adjusting hand or foot position to get a biomechanical advantage and continuing.

Here are some examples for different exercises:

Squat

Rest a few minutes and repeat. Do 2 to 4 total sets.

Biceps Curl

Rest a few minutes and repeat. Do 2 to 4 total sets.

Pull-Up

Rest a few minutes and repeat. Do 2 to 4 total sets.

Barbell Row

Rest a few minutes and repeat. Do 2 to 4 total sets.

If you take the time and use a little imagination, you can devise other Biomechanical Advantage Extended Sets of your own. In any event, you'll find that they're extremely effective and can add some interesting variety (and pain) to your workouts.