It takes a lot for a strength coach or trainer to catch the attention of our man TC. In case you didn't know, TC has "discovered" just about every well known strength coach you can think of. Through Muscle Media 2000 and now Testosterone, TC has brought to the forefront dozens of experts in various areas and made certifiable gurus out of them.

That's why my ears perked up when he told me about Don Alessi. Don's been building a name for himself in the private sector for years and is a colleague of Charles Poliquin and other notables in the field. The articles he's written for T-mag have caused quite a stir for two reasons. First, they're very different than most anything you've probably tried before. Second, and most importantly, they work tremendously well.

We thought it was time T-mag readers got to know the man behind Meltdown Training and the guy who, among other things, is going to help you get bigger biceps by training your legs.

Testosterone: Don, we don't know much about you at this point. Start by telling us what it is you do for a living.

Don Alessi:

T: I understand you train these guys who are working for you and certify them yourself?

DA:

T: So in other words, these guys can only get certified by working with you like an apprentice.

DA:

T: Honestly, Don, we hardly ever publish articles written by personal trainers because the vast majority of them just don't know shit. Do you take offense to the fact that T-mag bashes most of the personal trainers out there?

DA:

T: So what's an average week like for you?

DA:

T: So how did you get involved in all of this? Were you an athlete yourself back in school?

DA:

T: So what are your stats now?

DA:

T: Yeah, me neither (cough cough). What are your interests outside of fitness, bodybuilding and athletic preparation? Or do you have time for anything else?

DA:

T: I know the feeling. Are you married?

DA:

T: Have you worked with many professional athletes and celebrities?

DA:

T: Oh yeah, who?

DA:

T: Cool. Free tickets! Now, when the average guy comes to you for training, what is he usually doing wrong and what patterns do you notice? What do you have to fix in other words?

DA:

T: So although I don't compete on stage, my competitive period would be something like going to the Arnold Classic every year and wanting to look good?

DA:

[Editor's Note: Don will be joining the rest of the T-staff in February at the Arnold Classic.]

Most guys that have competed in bodybuilding have learned they're going to get their best results and make the most progress those twelve weeks before the show. You learn so much during that time about how your body works. Everyone needs some type of competitive period.

T: Where else are people screwing up?

DA:

T: Whoa there! What does that mean in plain English?

DA:

T: What problems do you see with technique?

DA:

T: Let's talk about why people reach a certain limit in their development and then stall out. I find that most people who say they've hit their "genetic limit" are really just screwing up somewhere in the areas of diet, training, or recovery. What do you think?

DA:

T: So too many people use genetics as an excuse?

DA:

T: Overtraining can be an excuse?

DA:

T: Do they just think they're overtrained and actually they're doing something else wrong?

DA:

T: Does nutrition play a role in this plateauing?

DA:

T: Let's talk about some of the programs you've written for us. The ab article has you training ab muscles you can't see, the arm program doesn't have you doing many curls, and the bench program starts out with leg work and doesn't focus much on benching. You're freaking people out here! What's the pattern I'm seeing with all of this?

DA:

T: So what you're saying is that if you want bigger biceps and triceps, you don't necessarily have to train them more often or more intensely.

DA:

T: So if my arms stop growing, I may have a weakness somewhere else in my body and therefore by brain is protecting me by not letting them get any bigger?

DA:

T: Very interesting. I see now how your Booming Biceps articles go about fixing this problem. Now, let's talk juice, and I ain't talking about orange juice. What's your general opinion about steroids?

Part 2 of "The Next Poliquin?" will be posted next week.