The core is arguably the most important part of the body when performing a push-up. After all, tying together the upper and lower body is the reason we perform push-ups versus bench presses. Find and hold a neutral spine position throughout. If you laid a PVC pipe or broomstick on your back, you should have three points of contact:

PVC Test
  • The back of the head
  • The upper back
  • The buttocks

If you want extra credit, make sure that you only have a slight (1 inch) space in between your lumbar spine and the stick. This will make sure your abs are optimally engaged.

Now Stay That Way

Getting into this position may be relatively easy, but the hard part is staying there when you actually do the movement.

What you tend to see is a lowering of the body, followed by deepening lordosis, a caving of the upper back, and a head that droops towards the floor. Instead, lock the spine in throughout and you'll not only get a great upper body workout, but a great core workout as well.

Related:  Push-Ups: You're Doing Them Wrong!

Related:  Push-Ups for Real Strength