In the old days, whenever a doctor said something anything it was pretty much taken as gospel. After all, they're all incredibly bright, they all pull down some serious cash, and, well, they're doctors.

Of course, those of us in our little field of kamikaze, theoretical, self-experimental bodybuilding have a different take on most physicians. How so? Well, most of us run away screaming when someone flashes his or her MD credentials. You can't blame us, though. Traditional medical education has taught doctors that steroids are a poison on par with strychnine; that any amount of protein greater than the RDA will practically cause your kidneys to fall out; and that creatine needs further research (even though there are hundreds, if not thousands, of studies supporting its use).

Happily, there are always exceptions. Nowadays, there are doctors who are elbow-deep in the area of bodybuilding and physique augmentation. And man, when you find someone like that, you've really got something.

Dr. Eric Serrano is one of these enlightened physicians. In fact, Serrano is so hip on supplements that more often than not, he prescribes over-the-counter supplements to his patients in lieu of drugs. He also conducts private studies on just about any new supplement that comes down the pike. Of course, he also has a deep-rooted personal interest in new supplements because he's a competitive power lifter who most recently set a record in a Midwest tri-state meet for total weight.

Serrano currently runs a private clinic in Columbus, Ohio, along with teaching classes at Ohio State's medical school. Although we did this interview over the phone, we just know he's sitting there in an extra-large, white lab coat with the sleeves torn off, in an office that has as many bench presses as it has EKG monitors.

T: Doctor Serrano, how did you get involved in sports nutrition?

DS:

T: How is it that you became such an expert on supplements? It's not like medical school teaches you about them?

DS:

T: Can you give me some examples of how you might prescribe supplements instead of drugs?

DS:

T: Doc, given that you're a strength athlete yourself, and that you no doubt work with a lot of athletes who take steroids, have you ever considered using them yourself?

DS:

T: What kinds of things do you generally take for yourself?

DS:

T: I understand you're a big proponent of glutamine?

DS:

T: What's the mechanism?

DS:

T: Is glutamine something you would take every day?

DS:

T: Charles Poliquin told me that you've run some experiments on Tribex-500?

DS:

T: That's interesting, because that's one of the protocols we've been experimenting with. Speaking of hormone facilitators, are you experimenting with any other ones?

DS:

T: Tell me about some of the other supplements you've experimented on. For instance, what's your opinion of HMB?

DS:

T: The last time I spoke to you, you were very high on fish oil?

DS:

T: Are capsules okay, as opposed to straight oil?

DS:

T: A lot of bodybuilders use flax seed oil and borage. How would you compare these to the fish oils?

DS:

T: Why would the fish oil make me stronger?

DS:

T: A few weeks ago, we theorized in one of our columns that it might be a good idea to take supplements with grapefruit juice. We suspect that a chemical in the grapefruit juice might block an enzyme in the body that breaks supplements down. What do you think of that?

DS:

T: Are there any supplements you stay away from?

DS:

T: Since we're talking about creatine, do you have any specific recommendations concerning its use?

DS:

T: You're a teaser, Doc. All right, we'll wait to hear your specific recommendations about creatine cycling. You must run into a good deal of interesting people. Are you in touch with anybody else right now who's doing interesting work?

DS:

T: That sounds interesting. Call us when you hear anything definitive. By the way, do you do telephone consulting?

DS:

T: Doc, I'm trying to give you a plug here?

DS:

T: Doc, give us a telephone number?

DS:

T: Thanks for your time, Doc.

DS: