Q: Could you give me some advice on how to get my forearms to grow? They don't seem to want to budge at all, no matter what I do. I recently started using thick grips whenever possible to hopefully remedy the problem. Should I use thick grips on every exercise possible or vary the grip from exercise to exercise? Help turn me into Popeye!

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Q: I'm a fan of yours because everything you've ever written has worked for me. I have one big problem, though my legs. I'm 186 cm tall, weigh 96 kg, and am a lifetime natural. My problem is that my upper leg size (quad and hams) isn't what it's supposed to be (I do have great calves, though). I can barely squat 120 kg for 6 reps, although I can bench more than that. Please help with some kind of a routine for upper legs because the rest of my body grows quite well (even better since trying some of your ideas).

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Q: I know that if you're doing specialization work with a certain body part, you're supposed to cut back on the volume for other body parts, so as not to cut into the gains you might be making. If I follow your arm specialization program from the "Max Weights" article, how do I incorporate the chest, back, and legs into my routine, without taking away from my arm development? Can I still make gains, let's say in my chest, despite cutting back in the amount of sets I'm doing, or can I only expect to maintain my chest development? Thank you for your time and patience.

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Q: I really appreciate you taking the time to answer my question. I'm 6-foot-2, 218 pounds, 17% body fat, and 25 years old. I've been bodybuilding for 1 year and I'm caught up in a dilemma: Should I cut up now to a single digit body fat percentage or not worry about a little flab and just go on and get massive? I plan to compete at about 235-240 at 5% body fat.

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Q: I want to take advantage of your special book offer. I want to pre-order your arm training book and your second edition of the Poliquin Principles (I already have the first one). I will send you my credit card data via fax if I get a number from you. While I'm at it, I have a few questions, too. You mentioned a few times that: 1) if you train for relative strength, TUT [time-under-tension] should be under 20 seconds, 2) if you train for hypertrophy, TUT should be around 40-70 seconds, and 3) you adapt to a routine in 6 training sessions or less.

How did you arrive at those numbers? Is this just your personal experience, or have other coaches found the same thing? Are there any studies to prove the numbers?

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Q: Hi! I'm interested in buying your new book, "Winning the Arms Race." However, previous purchases of other arm books have left me disappointed (Manfred Hoeberl, Larry Scott, etc.). What's so different about yours?

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