If your goal is to move as much weight as possible, a low hip position isn't the best way to go. But this isn't about the best way to deadlift as much weight as possible. We're talking about working the quads here, and if that's the goal, a lower hip position deadlift where you try to visualize squatting the weight up can be a pretty damn good exercise that's much more knee-friendly than squatting.

Start by getting your butt down and your chest up with your weight on your heels. As you break the bar off the floor, it's imperative that the hips and shoulders stay in sync in order to protect your back and keep the stress on your legs.

You're going to have to drop the weights significantly to do this correctly. I'd even start with 30-40% of what you think you can deadlift normally as you adjust to the new technique. It's important to be strict with these, both for the health of your back, and to make sure the stress stays on the quads.

I know that seems extremely light, but if you're doing it right, your quads will feel it. You don't have to stay super light forever and your numbers should climb quickly, but don't add weight at the expense of form. The devil is in the details with these.

From time to time I also like to do them from a slight deficit to increase the range of motion. If doing so causes you knee pain, or you don't have the requisite mobility to get that low with a flat back, avoid pulling from a deficit and just pull from the floor.

My favorite stance is what I'd call "semi-sumo" with my feet slightly wider than shoulder width. If you remove the bar from the equation and just look at the movement, this really looks more like a parallel squat.

Related:  Knee-Friendly Quad Builders

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