Strong Grip = Babe Magnet

In the world of scientific research, grip strength is considered to be a central dimension of health and a reliable indicator of fitness. Based on dozens of studies, men with a stronger grip...

  • Have better cardiovascular health
  • Score better on intelligence tests
  • Have better overall mental functioning
  • Are generally more athletic
  • Are more socially aggressive and dominant in a positive way, often related to having more financial success
  • Are more likely to age well (remain mobile and active, suffer fewer fractures etc.)

So it's pretty easy to jump to the conclusion that men with a stronger grip also make good marriage material – all of the above are basically Darwinian fitness indicators. Whether females consciously realize it, they want their future husband to be a healthy provider and strong protector. And they don't want to pass on dumb-guy, pantywaist genes to their offspring.

Various studies back this up. One study of over 5000 men found that guys with a strong grip are more likely to marry. The study's author, Professor Vegard Skirbekk, noted that "...women may be favoring partners who signal strength and vigor when they marry."

On the flip side, men with a weaker grip are less likely to marry. Lack of handgrip strength signals NOT having those positive, mate-getting attributes listed above.

How Do I Use This Info?

As a reader of T Nation, you probably lift weights and have a stronger than average grip strength. So use this research to feel superior.

Pound your chest, drop some really Brobdingnagian vocabulary words into casual conversations, crush your competition at work, and hold your pretty wife's hand tightly... because you can.

Okay, what you're probably really asking is, "Should I work on my grip strength to make sure I stay attractive and healthy?"

Well, remember it's not that there's something magical about grip strength; it's about grip strength being an indicator of overall strength, mental and physical health, and longevity potential – primal mate-attracting attributes. But a little focused grip work sure wouldn't hurt.

Related:  5 Grip & Forearm Exercises That Actually Work

Related:  The Ultimate Grip Strength Test

Reference

  1. Skirbekk et al. Women’s Spousal Choices and a Man's Handshake: Evidence from a Norwegian Study of Cohort Differences, SSM-Population Health, 2018.