Hate doing direct arm work but still want your arms to grow? Then start every session with a lot of pull-ups. Use two different workouts:

Workout A: Perform 50 pull-ups in as little time as possible.
Workout B: Perform as many pull-ups as possible in 10 minutes.

Alternate workouts during the training week (A-B-A-B, etc.)

The Strategy

The biggest mistake seen with the A days is trying to do too many reps in the first set. If you go anywhere near failure on any of the sets, it will greatly hinder your ability to complete the task in decent time. The same thing holds true for B days. If you start too fast you'll quickly burn out and won't even be able to do even one more pull-up, thereby defeating the purpose of the method. Try to end each set with 2 or more reps in the tank so that you can be ready to go in 15-20 seconds.

Notes

  1. This method works best with lifters who can do 8-10 strict pull-ups. Use an elastic band to provide help if you can't do that many. If you can do a lot more than 10 strict pull-ups (15 or more), then add weight – just enough to knock you back to 8-10 strict reps.
  2. Be sure to mix up your choice of grip. Change it as often as you want during a workout. The supinated or underhand grip hits the biceps more. The neutral grip (palms facing one another) will target the brachialis. The pronated grip – palms facing away from you – fries the corachobrachialis.

Related:  Workouts for Non-Responsive Biceps

Related:  Pull-Ups: You're Doing Them Wrong