Here's my favorite new exercise:

Unilateral Reverse-Band Press with Asymmetrical Loading and Tripodal Instability

It sounds complex but it's simply a bench press where the athlete is lying on a foam roller with his feet on a pair of BOSU balls. This is amazing at improving the magnification of the bilateral structural unitary function of the bodily apparatus.

I opted to use a foam roller to increase the bipolar optimization of the apex demagnetization. By doing so we decrease the contra-lateral compensatory winging. That latter portion is also why I use the unilateral (only on one side) reverse band method with asymmetrical loading.

On top of the effect on the contra-lateral compensatory winging we also improve the biserial automatization response of the parabulus cortex to desensitize the vacillating reflex.

Wait! I'm Kidding!

Don't kill yourself trying this crap!

The truth is, I'm a big-basics kinda guy: squat, front squat, deadlift, bench, overhead press, rows, snatches, cleans, and pulls. But I do believe in using less conventional variations of the big basics.

I have one rule: The "new" lift must provide an additional and significant benefit over the basic drill without having a significant loss of effect versus the big basic. But if those benefits make me miss out on the benefits of the original drill, I won't do it.

Another acceptable reason for coming up with an unconventional version of a lift is to allow someone who can't do one of the big basics to still train the movement pattern heavy. For example, a friend of mine can't do front squats because of an old clavicle injury from football, but he can do Zercher squats just fine.

Keep all this in mind when you come across a "new" exercise.

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