Dr. Ken Kinakin, much like Dr. Mike Leahy, knows your pain. In fact, he's made a living off of it. The doc is one of the best in the world at devising training protocols to help make you injury-proof. Yeah, he likes bodybuilding and powerlifting routines, too, but when it comes to figuring out how to fix what ails ya', he's one of the best.

This is the second part of our interview — Part 1 was posted last week.

T: You write a lot about treating the whole body when recovering from injury — not just muscles, but also nerves and joints. For example, guys don't pay much attention to their nervous system when it comes to recovery. They think, "Hey, my chest isn't sore anymore, time to hit bench again."

KK:

T: What's up with that, anyway?

KK:

T: How much of a decrease are we talking here?

KK:

T: You've written in one of your articles that we should be thankful for pain or a decrease in strength because our bodies are telling us something. What do you mean?

KK:

T: So athletes and bodybuilders make a mistake when they use pain medication?

KK:

T: Speaking of toolboxes, ART is one hell of big tool to have in there, isn't it?

KK:

T: We know that overtraining can lead to injuries, so let's talk about it.

KK:

T: That's a sign of overtraining?

KK:

T: So how do we combat this?

KK:

T: We hear a lot about taking megadoses of vitamin C for recuperative reasons.

KK:

T: How much of each of those?

KK:

T: Got any more unusual signs of overtraining?

KK:

T: What do you think of the Swiss ball? First everyone thinks that it's a moronic infomercial device, then everyone loves it and uses it for everything. Now people are saying that overuse could cause you to get weaker. What's your take?

KK:

T: What else do you see in the gym that makes you cringe?

KK:

T: Really? I do that. I just don't want to be one of those losers who piles on the plates and only brings the sled down a couple of inches. Can you go too far?

KK:

T: I'm convinced. How do we fix that problem?

KK:

T: Where else do you see guys screwing up in the gym?

KK:

T: Too high?

KK:

T: You've done bodybuilding and powerlifting. What do you think that bodybuilders can learn from powerlifters?

KK:

Note: Check out Maximal Weights and The 1-6 Principle by Charles for more on this method.

T: Since you're switching things up so much, could this prevent overtraining?

KK:

T: Once and for all, what's the best way to increase our bench?

KK:

T: The theme of individualization rises again!

KK:

T: No kidding!

KK:

T: Dr. Kinakin, this has been an eye-opening interview. Thanks for taking the time to talk with T-mag.

KK:

My head was spinning after our interview. The scariest thing for me was that I only scratched the surface of what Dr. Kinakin has to offer. If you'd like to learn more about his Society of Weight-Training Injury Specialists, call 877-220-7947. For more info on his "Encyclopedia of Weight-Training Injuries" book, call 905-812-0644. You can also read some of Dr. Kinakin's articles at the www.powerlifting.ca website.

At the beginning of this article, I told you about a huge symposium with speakers like Dr. Leahy and Dr. DiPasquale that took place in September. Dr. Kinakin arranged for the entire symposium to be videotaped, down to the last presentation. Call 905-812-0644 for more information on how to pick up the tapes. If you read Testosterone, you probably already train hard. With Dr. Kinakin's help, you can train smart, too, and keep growing well into the next century.