Think of bodybuilding as a language, and think of the exercises we do in the gym as words in that language. Trouble is, most of us have "vocabularies" smaller than that of Koko the gorilla, who recently was featured on a very popular AOL chat. (Koko was asked if he liked to talk to people, to which thousands and thousands of web surfers the world-over heard the answer, "Fine nipple." Huh? Koko need go back to skool.)

Anyhow, most of us learn a very basic repertoire of exercises and we stick with them until they pry our cold, dead, callused hands off the Olympic bar. It's understandable, though, since very few of us have the spare time to experiment with new exercises. The traditional bodybuilding mags don't help much, either, as most of the descriptions they give of different exercises are damn near incomprehensible. We once followed the instructions in a Muscle and Fitness for doing Bulgarian Dead Lifts and we ended up making beef stroganoff for six.

With that in mind, we've taken it upon ourselves to build your "vocabulary." Each month, we'll feature a new exercise either invented by one of us or by one of our colleagues. Try 'em out and let us know if you like them. And, if you have an exercise that you invented, e-mail us with a description of the exercise and we'll name it after you. Just think of the thrill you'll feel when you see Jablonski Rhomboid Squeezes mentioned in the same breath as Scott Curls!

Dumbbell Bench Press Fly Aways
For the Chest and Anterior Deltoids

Jerry Telle, strength-training's mad scientist, invented this exercise, or should we say, sequence of exercises. Telle, who has patented his training methodology under the catchy phrase, TELLEKINETIC training, has spent the better part of his adult life trying to figure out how to make you hurt. Much of his research was done with computerized machines that measured and graphed the force expelled by an athlete in doing any one of hundreds of exercises.

His underlying theme is to productively overload the muscle as much as possible during every phase of every repetition. In fact, this technique is so difficult and so intense that you actually have to train for it. As such, he's broken it down into three phases you won't even get to the real "Fly Aways" until Phase 3 of the workout. It might sound like a pain, but Telle strongly urges you to follow his preparation scheme (the intensity increases every three workouts).

Phase 1

Do the following routine for three workouts, resting about four days in between each workout. After three workouts, you can progress to Phase 2.

Exercise 1: Wide-Angle Chest Dumbbell Flys
Bend the elbows slightly, at about 135 degrees (that's halfway between 90 degrees and a straight arm (180 degrees).
Using a 2-1-1 tempo (two seconds for the lowering of the weight, a one-second pause, followed by one second for the lifting of the weight), do 6 to 7 reps to failure.
Rest 10 seconds.

Exercise 2: More Flys
Using the same weight, do some more flys. Only this time, keep your elbows at a 90-degree angle. Use a 2-1-2 tempo and rep out.
Rest 10 seconds.

Exercise 3: Dumbbell Bench Presses
Now, still using the same weight, rep out doing some conventional dumbbell bench presses. Use a 3-1-4 tempo and rep out.
Rest 3 to 4 minutes and repeat (do three total sets).

Phase 2

Do the following routine for three workouts, resting about five days in between each workout. After three workouts, you can progress to Phase 3.

Exercise 1: Wide-Angle Chest Dumbbell Flys
Same as Phase 1.

Exercise 2: More Flys
Same as Phase 1.

Exercise 3: Dumbbell Bench Presses
Now, still using the same weight, rep out doing some conventional dumbbell bench presses. Use a 3-1-4 tempo and rep out.
Rest 10 seconds.
Decrease the weight by 10 to 20% and rep out again.
Rest 3 to 4 minutes and repeat (do three total sets).

Phase 3

1) With your arms in the same 135-degree angle stipulated above, lower the dumbbells to your sides.
2) At the bottom position, switch to a 90-degree elbow angle and rep out (about 6 to 8 reps) using a 2-1-1 tempo.
3) When you reach failure, and without resting, bring the dumbbells to the shoulders and press them up (in other words, lift them using a conventional dumbbell bench press manner).
4) From the lockout position, lower the dumbbells, using a 90-degree elbow angle.
5) At the bottom, press them up again to the lockout position.
6) Continue in this manner, pressing the dumbbells up and then lowering them with the elbows at a 90-degree angle. Use a 3-1-2 tempo and work to failure.
7) Rest 10 seconds.
8) Lower the weight by about 10 to 20% and repeat.
9) Rest 3 to 4 minutes and repeat (do three total sets).

You may need at least six days of rest between workouts. If that isn't bad enough, Telle wants you to add another drop set every two workouts until you attain a total of 30 reps. Eventually, you may even need seven to nine days of rest in between workouts.

We tried this routine, and it made us feel like Richard Harris in that old "A Man Called Horse" movie when the Indians hung Harris from a tree by putting hooks through the skin on his chest. Ouch!

Telle tells us we ain't seen nothin' yet, though. "After you get used to this routine," says Telle, "we can get into the real heavy stuff you're gonna' love it."

We can hardly wait.