You've seen his name on a lot of recent T-Nation articles, and you've seen him pass out some outstanding training advice on the forum. And you've probably thought, "Man, that guy is smart, but who is he anyway?"

Let's find out. We sat down with Mike Robertson to find out who the hell he is and what the hell he does.

T-Nation: Okay, Mike. Who the hell are you, and what the hell do you do?

T-Nation: What flavor of lifting to you personally do?

Robertson:

T-Nation: I did some banging once in the weight room. Lemme tell ya, that bench smelled funny for a week! Anyway, how did you first get involved in lifting?

Robertson:

T-Nation: I think we all wish we could have a "re-do" on our first couple of years of lifting! Now, what's with this growing dispute among powerlifters who use gear (suits, wraps), and those who don't or choose to use a limited amount? Has powerlifting gear gone too far? I heard one of those new fangled shirts won a bench meet in Bloomington all by itself with no one in it.

Robertson:

T-Nation: You're a nice guy, Mike, so it's fun to get you stirred up and pissed off. Let's do that some more. What makes you really want to impale people on an Olympic bar?

Robertson:

T-Nation: Good point. I don't see how anyone could coach or work in this biz and not actually do the sport or train themselves. Moving on, what's one exercise that every T-Nation reader should be doing, but probably isn't?

Robertson:

T-Nation: What do you think about rounded-back lifts? I've seen smart people go both ways on this topic.

Robertson:

T-Nation: The Ian King fans are going to snap at you for those comments, but let's hit another subject. Is it important for the average gym-goer to know and test his 1RM on various lifts? Not talking about competitive powerlifters here, just the typical T-Nation reader.

Robertson:

T-Nation: Agreed. Low rep training can be hugely beneficial even for the "cosmetic" lifter. Now, you work with a lot of injured athletes. What's the most common lifting injury you see and how do we avoid it?

Robertson:

T-Nation: Let's flip to nutrition. Are powerlifters paying more attention to nutrition these days? The old advice was just to eat a ton. Are things changing?

Robertson:



T-Nation: And nutrition itself plays a big role in recovery.

Robertson:

T-Nation: Makes sense. What about supplements? Which ones are particularly helpful to performance athletes and powerlifters? Are these hugely different than those supplements that bodybuilders use?

Robertson:

T-Nation: Cool. What does the future hold for you? What's coming up?

Robertson:

T-Nation: We look forward to those articles and having you on the forum, Mike! Thanks!