A lot of Americans think that the muscle building world begins and ends at the shores and boundaries of North America. Call it snobbish; call it provincial; call it whatever you want; just make sure you call it incorrect. If you're one of those that thinks the physique world sun rises and sets on American shores, brace yourself because I'm going to pour the metaphorical equivalent of a bucket of ice-cold water down the front of your pants and baby, the shrinkage factor is going to be mighty, mighty, high.

Case in poin T: Brian Batcheldor is an English bloke a 230-pound power-lifting English bloke who's hefted weights between his tea and crumpets that would make most run-of-the-mill bodybuilders cry big, weepy tears into their runny scrambled egg whites. He's also an engineer by training and some years ago he turned his likewise powerful brain to the subject of sports supplementation. Think a lot of the current trends were discovered in America by self-appointed drug gurus? Think again. Many were being used by Brian and others like him in England and Europe years ago.

In a lot of ways, it's like the rock and roll scene in the sixties. Sure, we had Elvis (and I'm sure as hell not talking about that faux-Elvis freak Lonnie Teper, either) and Bo Diddley, but England had the Beatles, the Stones, and about a million other bands that helped make American music what it is today. The muscle building world is the same way. Think Americans discovered creatine? Ha! It was being used by British track athletes back in the 80's!

It's time to open up our minds. It's time to acknowledge some of the great minds of other countries. For starters, meet Brian Batcheldor. Brian spoke to us from his home in England:

T: Brian, very few people in America know anything about you. And furthermore, those reading this interview might well wonder what your credentials are

BB:

T: When did you first start training?

BB:

Currently, I work with about 15 powerlifting athletes and I'm also an investor in the gym [The Bournemouth Health Studio].

T: How is it that you're also interested in bodybuilding? I mean, typically, powerlifters generally regard bodybuilders with disdain

BB:

T: I understand you're knee-deep in the supplement business; not just selling them or anything, but actually developing them. With that in mind, tell me about some of the things you've been working on, starting with this phytic acid stuff.

BB:

T: I understand you're also working on a liquid androstenedione

BB:

T: You were the guy who worked with Biotest Labs on the "super flavone," FGP, right? Tell us about this stuff. I understand, from an article that appeared in Muscle Media a few years ago, that it was once used as an anti-osteoporosis drug in Hungary

BB:

T: Why wasn't the patent renewed?

BB:

T: What's the mechanism? How does it work?

BB:

T: How would you compare it to the other anti-estrogen that's been popping up all over the place, chrysin?

BB:

T: Tell me more about your personal experiences with FGP.

BB:

T: What about its effect on males?

BB:

T: Biotest has incorporated FGP in its Tribex-500 product, but that product also lists "Tribulus Terrestris"as an active component. Now, in my experience, most of the Tribulus products just don't work. What's your take on the herb?

BB:

T: Tribex-500 also contains something called "Avena Sativa." Personally, I've yet to find a whole lot of research on the stuff

BB:

T: What happens when you combine Avena Sativa and Tribulus Terrestris? Do they work independently of each other, or together?

BB:

T: What do you see for the future of supplementation? What area is going to be the hottest in the next few years?

BB: