The Intelligent & Relentless Pursuit of Muscle™

The Warrior Diet
An interview with Penthouse editor Ori Hofmekler


Every once in a while, I'll run into someone with a new idea about how to train or eat that's so contradictory to everything I think I know that I'll want to close my eyes, plug my ears, and bury my head in the pillow so I don't have to listen. After all, I'm just getting comfortable with what I think I know. I don't like having my world shaken up any more than necessary.

Once in a while, though, I'll listen. I may not buy — lock, stock, and barrel — what the person is saying, but if what they have to say makes me think, then I've been more than rewarded for my time.

Such was the case in my conversation with Penthouse health and fitness editor Ori Hofmekler. Ori is a bodybuilding fiend — a hound, if you will. I've never met him face-to-face, but from what Charles Poliquin tells me, the guy is an absolute physical rock, and I listen to rocks. After all, nature doesn't just confer "rockdom" on people — they have to earn it through hard training and rigorous dieting.

What Ori told me was so different, so open to criticism by 99 out of 100 nutritionists, self-proclaimed or otherwise, that I didn't know if I wanted to print it. Still, what he said intrigued me on certain levels. He discussed not only diet, but also history and anthropology, with some healthy doses of psychology and biology.

I'd like you guys out there to read this and tell me what you think. And, if you have enough questions and there's enough interest in general, I'll talk to Ori again.


T: Okay, Ori. Lay it on me. What's your "Warrior Diet" all about?

OH:

T: Warriors? Are you talking about modern warriors or ancient warriors?

OH:

T: I'm flabbergasted, and some sixth sense of mine is telling me to run, but I'd like to hear your explanation.

OH:

T: We know people like that.

OH:

T: But can you give me some examples of modern romantic figures?

OH:

T: Can you then give some examples of modern warriors?

OH:

T: But to be a true warrior — someone who needs to endure physical hardship, or even an athlete who needs to compete — you need some sort of glycogen storage, right? And that's hard to do when you eat only once a day.

OH:

T: So what you'd do is take somebody who's used to eating six times a day, and then have them start stretching the amount of time between feedings?

OH:

T: So try not eating breakfast until 10 o'clock in the morning?

OH:

T: So is the ultimate goal of one phase of this diet to actually work down to one meal a day?

OH:

T: So you can eat a little during the day?

OH:

T: Let me address what seems like two apparent contradictions. You said that this diet is more targeted toward being instinctive, but eating less frequently doesn't seem to be instinctive. Does it?

OH:

T: So it's your contention that this instinct is there, but we've lost it and need to be retrained.

OH:

T: And they act like prey.

OH:

T: So initially, you categorize many of the other popular diets as being diets of denial. But this, too, is a diet of denial. But only initially, until you get used to it...

OH:

T: I do notice that, most of the time, because I'm so busy, I have to remind myself to go eat something. I mean, it just escapes my mind. So what I'm getting from all of this, as you train your body — if your theories are correct — in time, you will train your body to be able to not feel these needs to eat, and you'll be able to work through those because your body systems will have adapted to this concept. And because of our intensely busy day, and the empty stomach, and dealing with the energy levels that we derive from being a little bit hungry, it will feel invigorating.

OH:

T: I just thought of something interesting. At my feet, at this moment, is a Staffordshire bull terrier. He's 50 pounds of muscle. Extremely powerful. Not an ounce of fat. Striations everywhere, and he free eats. He eats whatever he wants, but he'll eat about once a day...usually at night.

OH:

T: I have one more question, otherwise I'm approaching overload. I get the gist of this. I understand. So this diet would then be a diet for life, essentially, and not just a short period of time?

OH:

T: It's all very interesting. I'm wondering, though, if things like meal replacements have a place in your diet.

OH:

T: So what you're saying is that, as long as I had my protein, I could follow it up with three pizzas?

OH:

T: Well, I'm intrigued by it, because it would certainly make my life easier. I'm always worried about finding the time to eat. I forget all of the time.

OH:

T: Sure, there's a direct correlation between lactic acid and growth hormone.

OH:


By now, you're either ready to string Ori up and dismiss him as a heretic, or put him on your shoulders and parade him around your room (after throwing away your noon-time meal, of course).

Again, by no means do we advocate this type of diet...yet. It is, however, intriguing, and I hope that you'll at least think about some of the things he said and share your thoughts with us. After all, no free thinker would do otherwise.


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