Building High-Performance Muscle™

Evolutionary Fitness
An Interview with Art De Vany, Ph.D.


Dr. Art De Vany describes himself as a scientist/athlete. He's competed in Olympic weightlifting, motocross, and even played minor league baseball. At 6'1" and 208 pounds, today he carries only 8% body fat. Pretty admirable. De Vany barely had time to do this interview. He was headed off to Colorado to ride in the KTM Rocky Mountain Raid, an adventure motorcycling event.

Oh, did I mention Dr. De Vany is pushing 70 years old?

Yes, you read that right: 208 pounds, 8% body fat, bursting with energy… at age 68. Most 40 years olds today could only dream of being as fit as De Vany.

"I'm never sick," he says, "and I can do anything I want to do. Everyone should or could be this way." To help them along, De Vany is writing a book called Evolutionary Fitness. His ideas are interesting, thought provoking, and at times controversial. Sounds like good interview material to us.


T-Nation: Can you give us a brief overview of what you call "Evolutionary Fitness" and tell us what it means to diet and training?

Dr. Art De Vany:

T-Nation: Interesting, but many people will "turn off" immediately because of the term evolution. Does that bother you? Do you try to convince them otherwise?

T-Nation: Coming from the bodybuilding and performance community, I find myself cheering you on in your blog, but also thinking at times, "Wait, that can't be right!" about a few issues. Bodybuilding has some very ingrained ideas, for example: a man has to eat big to get big. True or false? Is a large amount of calories necessary for mass gains?

Dr. De Vany:

T-Nation: What about eating multiple, smaller meals all day long? For example, athletes, lifters, and even just fitness enthusiasts are often told to eat five to seven meals per day. The meals are supposed to be small and healthy, of course. Is that a good idea?

Dr. De Vany:

T-Nation: You actually prescribe a sort of short fast, right? Around 15 hours as part of sleeping? Please tell us about that and your "lean hunting days."

Dr. De Vany:

T-Nation: Besides frequent eating, where else do you see modern bodybuilders going wrong?

Dr. De Vany:

T-Nation: You prescribe brief, intense workouts with little emphasis on "show" muscles. Your own weight training workouts take as little as 25 minutes and you seldom do more than three sessions per week. Give us an example of a typical weight training workout for you.

Dr. De Vany:

T-Nation: Do you train to failure?

T-Nation: You also prefer morning, fasted workouts, correct?

Dr. De Vany:

T-Nation: What are your thoughts on cardio?

Dr. De Vany:

T-Nation: I like when anyone tells me not to run long distances, so I'll agree with you there! Now, you've also written about how people are dissatisfied with modern life because they lack real stimulation and adventure. What did you mean by that and how does this relate to evolution?

Dr. De Vany:

T-Nation: That makes sense. Now, you make a distinction between Western aging and natural aging. What's the difference?

Dr. De Vany:

T-Nation: How long have you been eating and living in an Evolutionary Fitness fashion? What are your stats today?

T-Nation: You recommend not keeping track of scale weight. What's a better option and why?

Dr. De Vany:

T-Nation: You summed up one of your papers by saying, "Learn to be a good animal." What did you mean by that?

Dr. De Vany:

T-Nation: Thought provoking interview. Where can T-Nation readers go to learn more about Evolutionary Fitness and your upcoming book?

T-Nation: Cool. Thanks for the chat.

 

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