The Intelligent & Relentless Pursuit of Muscle™

Dorian Yates
The Testosterone Interview



When you think of hardcore training, which professional bodybuilder's name pops right to mind? If you think of serious work in the gym and a no-bullshit training ethic, you're probably thinking of Dorian Yates.

Throughout his professional and competitive career, Yates was regarded as "The Shadow," someone who didn't run his mouth too much. He just showed up for contests and kicked everyone's ass. Always in tip-top condition onstage, his unwillingness to flap his gums for entertainment only added to the mystique. The man would be near 300 pounds with skin like transparent parchment. The other competitors would take one look at him and know they were fighting for second place. Until injuries forced him to retire, nobody could touch him.

Since retiring, Dorian has begun his own supplement company bearing his name and likeness and has been highly visible at bodybuilding shows and expos, but what he's continued to do is not talk too much to the press. Still very popular and remaining something of a man of mystery, Dorian Yates consented to a wide-ranging interview with T-mag.

If you're the most hardcore bodybuilder in the biz, what better forum?


Testosterone: The perception in the bodybuilding public is that you worked harder than anybody else in the world. In this whole equation, what role do anabolics play? It's a level playing field in the sense that everyone uses whatever they want to use, but for you, what was the most important part of this equation?

Dorian:

T: You seemed to just walk out onstage and intimidate them through personality and confidence. Was that part of the plan?

Dorian:

T: Earlier in your career Mike Mentzer was taking a great deal of credit for putting you on the road to "Heavy Duty" training. Did you ever train with Mentzer, and was he ever really associated with you in any way?

Dorian:

T: So he was an influence, like many people have been an influence?

Dorian:

T: What about in your coming-up years? Did you ever employ a strength coach?

Dorian:

T: So you kept an accurate food diary for all your years as a pro? Did you weigh your food?

Dorian:

T: Were you strict with what you ate?

Dorian:

T: It's difficult to increase or decrease calories in small increments, isn't it?

Dorian:

T: What's your take on Synthol and other spot-enhancing oils?

Dorian:

T: True, nobody knows the long term effects.

Dorian:

T: Let's talk training. Some feel it's important to strengthen all the little ancillary muscles. Do you feel that's important as well?

Dorian:

T: Do you ever use Smith machines and do you have any strong opinions about that piece of equipment?

Dorian:

T: That's fascinating because that flies in the face of so much advice.

Dorian:

T: Do you have a favorite manufacturer of machines?

Dorian:

T: You just answered one of my next questions!

Dorian:

T: Do you still own Temple Gym in England?

Dorian:

T: Some American gyms are like nightclubs.

Dorian:

T: What else about America did it take a while for you to get used to?

Dorian:

T: In general, or in the industry?

Dorian:

T: What's the most unusual thing you've seen happen in the gym?

Dorian:

T: Did you employ periodization in your training?

Dorian:

T: Your body forced you into it, once you began listening.

Dorian:

T: For instance, the way you trained in your workout video, Blood and Guts, you didn't do that five days a week all year 'round, right?

Dorian:

T: Did you change your workouts when you were dieting for a show, as opposed to not dieting?

Dorian:

T: Do you use lifting straps or gloves?

Dorian:

T: Did you do pull-ups at your heavy bodyweight?

Dorian:

T: Hammer named one of the rowing machines after you, didn't they?

Dorian:

T: What time of day did you train?

Dorian:

T: How long did your average workout take?

Dorian:

T: Some have called you the strongest professional bodybuilder who's ever lived. Are you?

Dorian:

T: So you've seen him workout? Are those crazy weights we read about real?

Dorian:

T: That's probably the single best advice anyone could give in this field.

Dorian:

T: Do you pay attention to time-under-tension?

Dorian:

T: For a bodybuilder, do you consider supplements or food to be more important? And I don't mean anabolics, I mean supplements.

Dorian:

T: If you're eating six or seven times per day, how many of them are food meals and how many are shakes?

Dorian:

T: I talked to you in March at the Arnold Classic and you're still big and looking good. Did you take time off after you retired?

Dorian:

T: Do your injuries bother you today? Any long term physical effects?

[Editor's note: for those of you who don't follow professional bodybuilding, Dorian tore and detached both his tricep and bicep on the same arm, at different points in his career.]

Dorian:

T: Why did you start up a supplement company?

Dorian:

T: Are you happy with where your company is right now?

Dorian:

T: I keep reading rumors on the internet that you're going to come out of retirement and/or compete in the Masters Olympia.

Dorian:

T: I hear you're moving to the States. Is that right?

Dorian:

T: I hope it works out. Thanks for the interview.

Dorian:


Even if you don't care much about pro-bodybuilding as a sport, you have to admire Dorian's work ethic, his quiet confidence, and most of all his "takin' care of business" attitude. Even if you never plan to step on stage yourself, you can learn something from Dorian. The Shadow knows.


© 1998 — 2009 Testosterone, LLC. All Rights Reserved.

PUBLISHED 
Discuss | Rate | Add Favorite | Print Version