Building High-Performance Muscle™

The New V-Diet Test Drive


A few months ago, coach Dan John said that the Velocity Diet was an insane diet for insane people. A few weeks later, he started the diet.

Well, that explains a lot, doesn't it?

All kidding aside, I was thrilled to have Dan try the diet. He's brutally honest, intrinsically curious, and he has the heart of a teacher.

He also had a big fat belly.

Now, I admire the hell out of Dan. He's an athlete, and at 49 years old he's still a record-breaking competitor. But after seeing Dan speak at a couple of seminars, I couldn't help but notice that his "strong guy gut" was getting bigger.

Now, Dan doesn't train to look good naked like a lot of us do, but this went beyond aesthetics: Dan was starting to look unhealthy. And after talking to him, I knew he had some other problems he needed to get a handle on. They weren't big problems, but they were growing.

For one thing, Dan was developing a bad case of visceral or central adiposity. That means he was accumulating fat sub-abdominally — underneath the abs. This creates a hard, pregnant belly look.

And worse, it's a sure sign of impending health problems. In fact, it's linked to just about every bad health issue out there that can kill you. It wouldn't be overly melodramatic to say that the "pregnant belly look" on males is a clear foreshadowing of an early death.

And Dan had it.

But he was ready to do something about it, something kinda crazy: go on my Velocity Diet. As a recap, the Velocity Diet is basically a liquid diet where you drink protein shakes all week and eat only one solid healthy meal on the weekend. You supplement with healthy fats and fibers and you have a post-workout drink after lifting.

The diet lasts 28 days, then you transition off. Most people lose 10 to 20 pounds or more and report a loss of cravings for unhealthy foods and new preferences for healthy ones after the diet ends. Basically, the diet "reprograms" their behaviors toward food, and fat loss usually continues after the diet is over.

Dan started the diet about the same time I was starting an updated V-Diet book, and he agreed to try out some of the new ideas. What happened? Let's talk to Dan.


Chris Shugart: First things first, Dan, what were your results after four weeks on the Velocity Diet?

Before After

Shugart: Excellent! And you had some killer abs and obliques under there too! Okay, so you lost 23 pounds during the diet, plus five whole inches off your waist measurement.

Let's cut off the naysayers and the perpetual critics right now. Sure, some of that was water weight and glycogen, but probably only a few pounds, if that. So, outstanding results!

I also notice that you kept the fat loss up after the diet was officially over. Now, most people rebound after a strict diet and blow up like the Michelin man. But with the Velocity Diet, people usually experience radical food preference changes and overall behavioral changes when it comes to nutrition. Put all that together and the fat loss is permanent, plus they can continue to lose fat, if needed.

Now, didn't you also take some blood tests?

Dan John:

Shugart: The centralized adiposity, that nasty sub-abdominal "heart attack fat," is pretty much gone! That's great news, Dan. Now, what made you decide to do this crazy diet?

Dan John:

Shugart: I like what you said about the discipline aspect. I have a theory here that some people thrive on this diet because it gives them full control over one aspect of their hectic lives. It's an empowering and somewhat enlightening experience. Or is that just corny?

Dan John:

Shugart: I hope so. The rapid fat loss aside, the Velocity Diet seems to give people some control back, and that control transcends into other aspects of their lives.

Okay, just another thought I want to toss out regarding the psychology of all this: sometimes the best choice to make is to have no choice. Do the V-Diet as written and all of your daily choices regarding food are taken care of.

We all know that to lose fat and get healthier you have to "eat less and exercise more," but it doesn't work for most people based on the skyrocketing obesity rate. People have too many choices with most diets: what to eat, when to eat, how much to eat, how to prepare it, etc.

With the V-Diet, no choices. And for a lot of people, it's allows them to thrive. Any thoughts on that?

Dan John:

Shugart: Aw, shucks. Give us a quick outline of what you did every day.

Dan John:

Shugart: Funny, I read once that if your dog is overweight, then you probably are too. Okay, what came next?

Dan John:

Shugart: Yeah, a few modifications are fine if made by well read, experienced folks, but some people go overboard with the changes until they're basically no longer doing the diet.

You, for example, really like natural Testosterone boosters and were using Alpha Male. But since it contains Carbolin 19 and so does your fat burner, HOT-ROX Extreme, you subbed the Alpha Male for Tribex Gold. No problem. Most people do the diet successfully with no T-booster, but the extra edge can't hurt.

But those who exchange the Metabolic Drive for a sub-quality protein product inevitably fail the diet. The crap protein isn't supportive of the diet, it either contains no micellar casein or not enough, and it often tastes bad, which ruins compliance. Want to increase your chances of failing the diet? Use something besides Metabolic Drive. Do I sound like a shill? Tough titty. Use what works or don't use my diet.

Okay, rant over. What type of training did you do during this 28 day period, Dan?

Dan John:

Shugart: Holy crap! Sounds tough!

Dan John:

Shugart: I'm the same way with sex. This year maybe I can try two new things. I'm going for a PR. Okay, next topic, you're an athlete and a coach — a performance guy — so how was that aspect during and after the diet?

Dan John:

Shugart: Now, did you get any of those craving changes reported by most V-Dieters?

Shugart: Hey, roasted chicken is better than burgers and fries! So, how did you get into the right mindset at the onset of the diet?

Dan John:

Shugart: Were there any other take-home lessons or things that you learned during the diet?

Dan John:

Shugart: I've had a lot of people tell me they've gained "strength" during the diet, which sounds impossible. But maybe, for the first time, they were getting enough protein to support their training while on this diet. Maybe they took that frequent meals thing seriously for the first time. Maybe they lost the chub and became more athletic and (dare I say it?) functional. You can certainly knock out more push-ups, pull-ups, chins, and dips when the excess fat is stripped off.

Okay, what was the worst part of the diet?

Dan John:

Shugart: That's a good tip. I think one of the best things a V-dieter can do is post a journal of sorts on an internet forum. Put yourself out there. Take before pictures and set a date for afters. It'll help you and it'll help others about to go through the same thing.

What other tips can you pass on to future Velocity dieters?

Dan the day before the diet: "baggie night."

Shugart: Good tips. Those cheap travel blenders at Wal-Mart are great.

How did you transition off the diet? Any tips for that stage?

Dan John:

Shugart: Shocking, but true! Thanks for your honesty through all this Dan. You're an inspiration, and I don't care how corny that sounds!


Notes and Updates on the Diet

For those not familiar with the original Velocity Diet articles (the experimental stages), you can find them here:

The Velocity Diet, Part I

The Velocity Diet, Part II

As mentioned, an updated and detailed Velocity Diet book is being written. But if you're interested in starting the diet right now, the articles linked above can guide you. Here are a few modifications to consider:

Questions? Just reply to this article and we'll be glad to help you out!

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