The Intelligent & Relentless Pursuit of Muscle™
Author: Lonnie Lowery, PhD

The Nutritional Dr. House: Case 1, Larry the Lethargic Lifter
by Lonnie Lowery, PhD | Tue, Jan 03, 2012

Bodybuilding's Dr. House applies his nutritional knowledge and insight to cure a lifter who's lost his will to lift.

Train More or Eat Less?
by Lonnie Lowery, PhD | Wed, May 18, 2011

When your diet stalls, should you decrease calories or increase exercise? Dr. Lowery has the answer.

Forced Anabolism: How to Overeat
by Dr. Lonnie Lowery and Rob "Fortress" Fortney | Tue, Apr 12, 2011

Think you know how to eat to gain muscle? Think again.

Spot Reduction is Real: Here's How To Do It
by Lonnie Lowery, PhD | Tue, Feb 01, 2011

Target your lower abs and love handles with this freaky method of spot reduction!

Pulse Fast For Mass Phases
by Lonnie Lowery, PhD | Wed, Dec 15, 2010

How to use the Pulse Fast to build mountains of muscle without all the fat gain.

Cutting-Edge Muscle Science
by Lonnie Lowery, PhD | Thu, Jun 11, 2009

Dr. Lowery white-knuckled his way around the country to get the first word about the research that could change the way you train.

Thank You for Guzzling Corn Syrup
by Lonnie Lowery, PhD | Thu, Mar 26, 2009

The high-fructose corn syrup people are telling you their product is the same as sugar, but they're lying mo-fo's.

Inconvenient Truths: Protein, Health, and Strength Sports
by Lonnie Lowery, PhD | Tue, Feb 17, 2009

The Warrior Nerd battles the evil dietary establishment in a protein battle to the death.

Fat to Muscle - 07.06.07
by Lonnie Lowery, PhD | Fri, Jul 06, 2007

All dietary fats supply caloric density for supporting the energy-costly process of protein synthesis. This is a boon for thin, ectomorphic guys trying to gain weight. But since we Americans consume far too many trans fats and omega-6 type fatty acids, an increased focus on monounsaturated fatty acids (e.g. olive oil) and omega-3 fatty acids like flax and fish oils are even better.

Fiber Facts - 06.29.07
by Lonnie Lowery, PhD | Fri, Jun 29, 2007

The average American consumes just 5 to 15 grams of fiber daily. This is paltry and not well understood by our ancient DNA. New 2005 DRI Guidelines suggest 38 grams of total fiber per day for men and 25g daily for women. That's more than double what most people consume. In fact, 9 out of 10 Americans fall short. There's solid and growing evidence that higher fiber intakes offer lower risk of fat gain, partly by lowering the insulin and glycemic effects of a meal. So get more fiber!

Eat the Right Meat - 06.12.07
by Lonnie Lowery, PhD | Tue, Jun 12, 2007

I love beef in a big bloody way, but as a society we've taken cattle off their natural diet (grass) and served them up copious quantities of corn. Grass-fed beef is far superior to corn-fed beef. The fatty acid composition is much better suited for hardcore bodybuilders and health conscious folks alike.

The Password is NEPA - 05.01.07
by Lonnie Lowery, PhD | Tue, May 01, 2007

Although learning to be lazy can actually be a good thing for ectomorphs trying to gain weight, the opposite is true for any of us wondering why we can't lose that extra fat despite our workouts and dietary practices. Most of our kcal burning day is spent outside the gym. If you hate cardio, take a look at your non-exercise physical activity (NEPA). Stuck on a fat loss plateau? Take a look at your NEPA. Afraid to cut your calories any lower? Take a look at your NEPA.

End Nighttime Bingeing - 04.04.07
by Lonnie Lowery, PhD | Wed, Apr 04, 2007

Eating a big breakfast has been shown to result in lower daily calorie intake. This result, which could be related to less evening bingeing, might sound good to those who have a tough time staying away from after-dinner munchies. The effect is small, at just 100 kcal less per day, but it's nonetheless welcome to many dieters. Rather than a late-day satiating effect, the general increase in overall fiber intake among breakfast-eaters could be what's helpful. In any case, the 100 kcal reduction could add up over time. Don't skip a big healthy breakfast!

Fat Loss Troubleshooter: A New Bodybuilder's Algorithm
by Lonnie Lowery, PhD | Wed, Mar 14, 2007

Can't lose fat? Can't figure out why? Well, can you answer simple "yes" or "no" questions? Of course you can! And that's all Dr. L's nifty little algorithm requires. You should have the answer to your fat-loss dilemma in no time and soon be well on your way to buffdom.

The "F" Word - 02.27.07
by Lonnie Lowery, PhD | Tue, Feb 27, 2007

Eat 30-40 grams of fiber daily, mostly from fruits and vegetables. For reasons similar to protein, getting in 5-10 grams of fiber per meal prevents consumption of less desirable foods. This is because it's filling and offers metabolic advantages. Are you getting enough fiber?

Eat or Shrink! - 02.13.07
by Lonnie Lowery, PhD | Tue, Feb 13, 2007

Eat on a schedule regardless of hunger! Simply divide the number of needed daily macronutrients (protein, carbs, fat) by six meals and that's what's needed every two to three hours. Eat them or be a shrunken flabby-man. Period!

Beat the Snot Out of Death
by Lonnie Lowery, PhD | Tue, Jan 30, 2007

Are your bulking phases, or just the act of eating like a bodybuilder, shortening your athletic career or your life? It's possible, but Dr. L's got a plan and it involves "calorie restriction mimetics." Read, learn, live long and prosper.

Healthier Carbs Quicker - 01.22.07
by Lonnie Lowery, PhD | Mon, Jan 22, 2007

Buy whole grain or flax pasta (Hodgeson Mill has one with 500 mg linolenic acid and 6 g fiber) and cook it Sunday night. Then run hot water over it at mealtime. This is an old restaurant trick and makes pretty good — and instant — pasta. Mixing pasta 50/50 with nuked frozen veggies dilutes the carbs and kcal. Add in pre-cooked or canned chicken if you're swamped for time!

Strategic Overeating for Mass
by Lonnie Lowery, PhD | Thu, Jan 04, 2007

"No one in this world can you trust: not men, not women, not beasts... this you can trust." — Conan's father

10 Grams Before Cardio - 11.23.06
by Lonnie Lowery, PhD | Thu, Nov 23, 2006

Should morning cardio be performed on an empty stomach or not? Well, here's what I like to do: Add a half-scoop of protein to a cup of java an hour before mild to moderate morning cardio. This will help you attack stored fat directly, before the lingering protective effects of insulin get involved. The small amount of protein (about 10 grams) may actually help combat cortisol (a potential morning problem especially when coffee is involved) and preserve muscle mass without jacking your insulin too high.

The Sleep Factor - 11.20.06
by Lonnie Lowery, PhD | Mon, Nov 20, 2006

Did you know that enough sleep deprivation in rodents causes death? Or that there's a nearly linear relationship between hours of sleep and body mass index (a crude marker of obesity in non-athletes)? Or how about the fact that sleep debt contributes to carb intolerance and fat gain over time? Of course this is to say nothing of immune dysfunction, altered physical performance, and mental clarity. Lesson: Lack of sleep could be why your progress in the gym has stalled.

Cool Cortisol, Curb Colds - 11.08.06
by Lonnie Lowery, PhD | Wed, Nov 08, 2006

Two studies suggest an endocrine benefit of eating breakfast that could extend to more muscle mass and less downtime from training. The first investigation concluded that eating breakfast reduces circulating cortisol. The second suggests fewer severe upper-respiratory tract infections among breakfast eaters. And we can appreciate how annoying and distressing a head cold can be when it interferes with lifting well or even lifting. Moral: Don't skip breakfast!

One Mean Green - 10.26.06
by Lonnie Lowery, PhD | Thu, Oct 26, 2006

If you haven't heard of the wonders of broccoli, you may want to relocate out from under your rock. With bountiful phytochemicals, including cancer-fighting indoles (also found in cabbage and cauliflower), this is great stuff. Remember that cruciferous veggies provide indole-3-carbinol which has been shown to be anti-estrogenic. And let us not forget the soluble fiber and very few kcal that make broccoli a filling, satisfying boon for dieters.

One Mean Green - 10.13.06
by Lonnie Lowery, PhD | Fri, Oct 13, 2006

If you haven't heard of the wonders of broccoli, you may want to relocate out from under your rock. With bountiful phytochemicals, including cancer-fighting indoles (also found in cabbage and cauliflower), this is great stuff. Remember that cruciferous veggies provide indole-3-carbinol which has been shown to be anti-estrogenic. And let us not forget the soluble fiber and very few kcal that make broccoli a filling, satisfying boon for dieters.

Eat Cheap, Get Big - 10.03.06
by Lonnie Lowery, PhD | Tue, Oct 03, 2006

Eating well doesn't have to mean eating expensively. Yes, low-fat and low-carb specialty goodies are pricey, but these shouldn't be staples anyway! Canned salmon and tuna are cheap protein. Skim milk or even powdered milk is great on multiple levels such as high quality protein, potassium, vitamin D and calcium for fat loss, etc. Frozen fruits and vegetables are very comparable to fresh in quality and can be bought cheaply in one-pound bags. Dried beans are dirt-cheap. Lower-cost 18 packs of eggs are also a great, high-protein post-workout meal with toast (say, one or two whole eggs and six to eight egg whites with four pieces of toast and jam).

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